Posts tagged sanctuary

The staff were all over the moon meeting Jane Goodall on the weekend!

Fauna is excited to launch their new website today!! http://www.faunafoundation.org

SHARE YOUR LOVE THIS VALENTINE’S DAY WITH A CHIMPANZEE MONTREAL, QC – Have some extra love to share this Valentine’s Day? Then consider visiting the Fauna Foundation’s new website,www.faunafoundation.org, to learn about some very special Valentines who need and deserve a little extra TLC, not just on Valentine’s Day, but every day of the year! Fauna is Canada’s only chimpanzee sanctuary and is home to a variety of animals, including monkeys, goats, cows, a donkey and a lama, that have been abandoned and/or subjected to abuse. Some of the animals that call this sanctuary outside of Montreal home were even forced into medical research and subjected to numerous medical procedures and life-threatening illnesses. The newly designed website helps tell their stories and educate the public about bio medical research that is still being conducted on animals throughout North America. “The 12 chimpanzees that now get to call Fauna home have had incredibly difficult lives,” said Fauna Foundation Founder Gloria Grow. “At Fauna, we provide a place of a sanctuary, so they can live with their adopted human and chimpanzee families away from medical labs and where choice is an everyday activity,” Visitors to the website will also be introduced to Fauna’s two newest family members – Tatu and Loulis. Both chimps use American Sign Language to communicate with those around them. Since their arrival from Ellensburg, Washington last October, Tatu and Loulis have been telling their caregivers what they want and how they feel through sign language! “We owe these incredible beings so much for what they have sacrificed for us,” said Grow. “And while caring for them is an expensive venture, it’s something we must do.” The cost of caring for each chimpanzee exceeds $20,000 per year. The new website will help with fundraising efforts for the chimps and the rest of the animals at Fauna. “We survive on the generosity of caring people from around the world. The chimps have many friends, but can always use more. That’s why we have worked so hard to update our website, so it better tells the Fauna animal’s stories through pictures and regular updates, and we made easier to support them,” added Grow. So share a little TLC with this special animal family on Valentine’s Day by learning more and supporting these special beings. Your donation towards the care of the chimps and other animals is true expression of kindness and love! To learn more about the chimps, the other animals at Fauna and the sanctuary itself, visit www.faunafoundation.org. You are also encouraged to share the love and stories you find on the website on your personal social media accounts, too!    Fauna is home to approximately 80 animals, each one with a story that can help educate us about the many ways in which animals are mistreated. Fauna hopes that by helping people become more aware of the plight of these wonderful animals, it will help change the way they are seen and treated. The Fauna Foundation was awarded the Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries (GFAS) accreditation in 2012 – a first in Canada. The story of the making of the sanctuary, as well as some of the current resident chimpanzees and those who have since passed are told by Canadian Award-winning author Andrew Westoll in his book The Chimps of Fauna Sanctuary.

Fauna is excited to launch their new website today!! http://www.faunafoundation.org

SHARE YOUR LOVE THIS VALENTINE’S DAY WITH A CHIMPANZEE
 
MONTREAL, QC – Have some extra love to share this Valentine’s Day? Then consider visiting the Fauna Foundation’s new website,www.faunafoundation.org, to learn about some very special Valentines who need and deserve a little extra TLC, not just on Valentine’s Day, but every day of the year!
 
Fauna is Canada’s only chimpanzee sanctuary and is home to a variety of animals, including monkeys, goats, cows, a donkey and a lama, that have been abandoned and/or subjected to abuse. Some of the animals that call this sanctuary outside of Montreal home were even forced into medical research and subjected to numerous medical procedures and life-threatening illnesses. The newly designed website helps tell their stories and educate the public about bio medical research that is still being conducted on animals throughout North America.
 
“The 12 chimpanzees that now get to call Fauna home have had incredibly difficult lives,” said Fauna Foundation Founder Gloria Grow. “At Fauna, we provide a place of a sanctuary, so they can live with their adopted human and chimpanzee families away from medical labs and where choice is an everyday activity,”
 
Visitors to the website will also be introduced to Fauna’s two newest family members – Tatu and Loulis. Both chimps use American Sign Language to communicate with those around them. Since their arrival from Ellensburg, Washington last October, Tatu and Loulis have been telling their caregivers what they want and how they feel through sign language!
 
“We owe these incredible beings so much for what they have sacrificed for us,” said Grow. “And while caring for them is an expensive venture, it’s something we must do.” The cost of caring for each chimpanzee exceeds $20,000 per year.
 
The new website will help with fundraising efforts for the chimps and the rest of the animals at Fauna. “We survive on the generosity of caring people from around the world. The chimps have many friends, but can always use more. That’s why we have worked so hard to update our website, so it better tells the Fauna animal’s stories through pictures and regular updates, and we made easier to support them,” added Grow.
 
So share a little TLC with this special animal family on Valentine’s Day by learning more and supporting these special beings. Your donation towards the care of the chimps and other animals is true expression of kindness and love!
 
To learn more about the chimps, the other animals at Fauna and the sanctuary itself, visit www.faunafoundation.org. You are also encouraged to share the love and stories you find on the website on your personal social media accounts, too!  
 
 
Fauna is home to approximately 80 animals, each one with a story that can help educate us about the many ways in which animals are mistreated. Fauna hopes that by helping people become more aware of the plight of these wonderful animals, it will help change the way they are seen and treated.
 
The Fauna Foundation was awarded the Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries (GFAS) accreditation in 2012 – a first in Canada. The story of the making of the sanctuary, as well as some of the current resident chimpanzees and those who have since passed are told by Canadian Award-winning author Andrew Westoll in his book The Chimps of Fauna Sanctuary.

Monkey Month on Facebook!

This month is Monkey Month on the Fauna Facebook page. Over the years, Fauna has rescued 6 monkeys from unfortunate research facilities. There are currently 4 monkeys with us, living their lives peacefully in the monkey house. Darla and Newton, both rhesus macaques, Sophie, a cinnamon capuchin and Theo, a majestic olive baboon.

If you are interested in learning more, come by for a visit!

Today we are all thinking of Donna Rae on what would have been her 48th birthday. You can read her entire story here: http://www.faunafoundation.com/html/donnaraeprofile.html
Donna Rae arrived at LEMSIP when she was 12 years old from the Animal Kingdom Talent Service. She apparently learned to play a guitar and ride a bicycle. Her kind nature got her a place in the breeding program but not forever. In her last five years at the lab, Ch-304 was involved in several studies on HIV. Following one intervention, the pain was so intense that it put her into a state of shock. During her years as a research chimp she would endure many days filled with pain from lymph node and bone marrow biopsies, sex skin wounds inflicted during knock-downs, or the constant irritation that must have followed the perpetual vaginal washes. Continually mutilating herself, Donna always looked as though she had given up all hope.

Today we are all thinking of Donna Rae on what would have been her 48th birthday. You can read her entire story here: http://www.faunafoundation.com/html/donnaraeprofile.html

Donna Rae arrived at LEMSIP when she was 12 years old from the Animal Kingdom Talent Service. She apparently learned to play a guitar and ride a bicycle. Her kind nature got her a place in the breeding program but not forever. In her last five years at the lab, Ch-304 was involved in several studies on HIV. Following one intervention, the pain was so intense that it put her into a state of shock. During her years as a research chimp she would endure many days filled with pain from lymph node and bone marrow biopsies, sex skin wounds inflicted during knock-downs, or the constant irritation that must have followed the perpetual vaginal washes. Continually mutilating herself, Donna always looked as though she had given up all hope.

 For all those we lost in 2013…may they rest in peace. 
“Death leaves a heartache no one can heal, love leaves a memory no one can steal.”
Pour tout ceux qu’on a perdu en 2013… Reposez en paix
 ”La mort laisse un chagrin qui ne peut guérir, l’amour laisse un souvenir  qu’on ne peut voler”
 

 For all those we lost in 2013…may they rest in peace. 

“Death leaves a heartache no one can heal, love leaves a memory no one can steal.”

Pour tout ceux qu’on a perdu en 2013… Reposez en paix

 ”La mort laisse un chagrin qui ne peut guérir, l’amour laisse un souvenir  qu’on ne peut voler”

 

Un gros ”pant-hoot” pour Tatu qui célèbre son premier anniversaire chez Fauna! Joyeux 38e anniversaire Tatu!
A great big pant hoot for Tatu on her first birthday spent at Fauna! Happy 38th Tatu!

Un gros ”pant-hoot” pour Tatu qui célèbre son premier anniversaire chez Fauna! Joyeux 38e anniversaire Tatu!

A great big pant hoot for Tatu on her first birthday spent at Fauna! Happy 38th Tatu!

Rachel arrived at Fauna on September 12, 1997. Before Rachel was abandoned at the LEMSIP research labs, she lived in Florida.
Taking bubble baths and wearing frilly dresses, Rachel was someone’s pet. Then, when she was not even 3 years old, her ‘nanny’ brought her to the lab. There Ch-514 was involved in 3 studies enduring 39 punch liver biopsies.
Mostly she was treated for the wounds and abrasions to her wrists and neck that were self-inflicted during the many anxiety attacks she had. She also suffers from the ‘phantom hand’ syndrome.
She has bitten all of her nails to the quick rubbing them until there is nothing left. This she does when she is calm; it is terrifying and heartbreaking to see her when she is not.
Please read her story: http://www.faunafoundation.org/html/rachelprofile.html

Rachel arrived at Fauna on September 12, 1997. Before Rachel was abandoned at the LEMSIP research labs, she lived in Florida.

Taking bubble baths and wearing frilly dresses, Rachel was someone’s pet. Then, when she was not even 3 years old, her ‘nanny’ brought her to the lab. There Ch-514 was involved in 3 studies enduring 39 punch liver biopsies.

Mostly she was treated for the wounds and abrasions to her wrists and neck that were self-inflicted during the many anxiety attacks she had. She also suffers from the ‘phantom hand’ syndrome.

She has bitten all of her nails to the quick rubbing them until there is nothing left. This she does when she is calm; it is terrifying and heartbreaking to see her when she is not.

Please read her story: http://www.faunafoundation.org/html/rachelprofile.html

36 year old Maya, 37 year old Spock and the late dear Sophie all arrived on November 6, 2007 from the Quebec City Zoo. All three were born in captivity in Norman, Oklahoma  at The Institute for Primate Studies Inc. The three of them were then sold to the University of Montreal to take part in cross-fostering and cognition studies where they grew up with human children and other chimpanzee youngsters. When the studies ended, as is the case with most in these situations, they were abruptly separated from all the companions they knew. They were donated to the zoo to live “on exhibit” which is where they lived the next twenty-five years before finally finding a safe haven at Fauna.

36 year old Maya, 37 year old Spock and the late dear Sophie all arrived on November 6, 2007 from the Quebec City Zoo. All three were born in captivity in Norman, Oklahoma  at The Institute for Primate Studies Inc. The three of them were then sold to the University of Montreal to take part in cross-fostering and cognition studies where they grew up with human children and other chimpanzee youngsters. When the studies ended, as is the case with most in these situations, they were abruptly separated from all the companions they knew. They were donated to the zoo to live “on exhibit” which is where they lived the next twenty-five years before finally finding a safe haven at Fauna.

Regis was only 2 when he was treated for his first stress-related event—he chewed his finger nail completely off.
The following year he was treated for depression and anorexia (he weighed less than 20 pounds at 3 years of age). He had still not participated in any study. During the 3 studies Ch-645 was involved in, he was lethargic, withdrawn and depressed.
He refused to eat and drink. When he is particularly stressed he suffers from anxiety attacks during which he nearly stops breathing - so badly is he gagging and convulsing.
It took over an hour for this very stressed, very anxious chimpanzee to leave his transport cage and enter his sanctuary home on September 12, 1997.
Please read the rest of Regis’ story here:http://faunafoundation.org/html/regisprofile.html

Regis was only 2 when he was treated for his first stress-related event—he chewed his finger nail completely off.

The following year he was treated for depression and anorexia (he weighed less than 20 pounds at 3 years of age). He had still not participated in any study. During the 3 studies Ch-645 was involved in, he was lethargic, withdrawn and depressed.

He refused to eat and drink. When he is particularly stressed he suffers from anxiety attacks during which he nearly stops breathing - so badly is he gagging and convulsing.

It took over an hour for this very stressed, very anxious chimpanzee to leave his transport cage and enter his sanctuary home on September 12, 1997.

Please read the rest of Regis’ story here:http://faunafoundation.org/html/regisprofile.html

Dear friends of Fauna,

Hello, and how are you? We have so much to share with you!

If you have been following us on Facebook or the blog, you are likely in step with what’s happening at Fauna, but if you aren’t, then get ready for some big news…

Tatu and Loulis

We now have two wonderful new residents living at Fauna! Tatu and Loulis arrived August 22 from the Chimpanzee and Human Communication Institute (CHCI) in Ellensburg, WA, at Central Washington University. Tatu and Loulis are the remaining two chimpanzees from a family of five that were part of the sign language studies from years ago at CHCI.

Tatu Loulis

In 1995, while on an Earthwatch mission to learn about caring for chimpanzees, I visited CHCI and was introduced to Tatu, Loulis, Moja, Dar and Washoe. They were the very first chimpanzees I ever met, and the ones who inspired me to start a sanctuary and to work towards ending chimpanzee research. I was forever touched by these remarkable beings and they were the catalyst for changing my life. So for me, this is a full circle, to be with Tatu and Lou again.

Over the years Tatu and Loulis lost their family. In 2002 Moja passed away, then in 2007 Washoe, and just one year ago, on November 24th, dear Dar passed away. Plans had been in motion to renovate their home to prepare for additional chimpanzees to join them at CHCI, but things had stalled. The clock ticked and the University remained indecisive about their plans. Time was also passing for Tatu and Loulis, who were dealing with the sadness of their recent loss. As much as everyone worked hard to keep them company and offer friendship, it was clear to Friends Of Washoe that plans would need to be made to relocate Tatu and Loulis, permanently. They wanted them to feel secure, and not threatened.

The University ultimately chose not to fund the changes needed, and Friends Of Washoe, the trust who ‘’own’’ and care for Tatu and Loulis, decided they did not want the two of them to remain in such an unstable environment with a University Director who had no intention of securing their home, and intent on ending their project.

There were five amazing NAPSA sanctuaries willing to take the two special chimpanzees, however, with time passing quickly and the University’s plans for the future uncertain, it was decided a move sooner rather than later, was essential. There was little time for sanctuaries to prepare but luckily, Fauna was ready to open their doors.

Fauna has been through many losses over the years, and we have also welcomed new arrivals. Change was not unfamiliar. Remember, Toby came in 2002. Then in 2007 Spock, Maya, and Sophie arrived. We also had space, and we had our own social situations, a fission-fusion society that would allow the Fauna chimpanzees the ability to move and adjust to these new friends. This meant Fauna met the unique criteria to be able to offer Tatu and Loulis a new home right away.

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So what happened next?

As all of you know, in 2012 Pepper passed away, leaving behind her very lonely little friend, Sue Ellen. Sue Ellen was very close to Pepper and spent every day in her company, Pepper never faraway. Sue has not lived in big groups for a few years now. She is frail, and has a serious limp from an old hip injury, along with vision problems and of course loss of hearing.

Our preference has been to make sure she is not with dynamic chimpanzees who have no regard for her condition. The months after Pepper’s death we tried many situations; Sue Ellen spent time with Petra, Jethro, Regis, Yoko, Rachel and Chance. Chance was the chosen companion for months, and that was not without its challenges, but at least it was company. Often we needed to make sure Sue could be alone for a while to rest and have some peace.

One day, noticing Spock hanging around and choosing to be alone—away from his friend Binky, and lifetime companion Maya—a suggestion was made to reunite Sue Ellen and Spock. It seemed like a good idea, and it went so well. We opened the doors for them to be together again, and they were both very happy see each other. So, it seemed Sue Ellen now had a nice calm fellow to spend time with, and that was special. However, Spock is missed by Binky and Maya and often wants to go back and visit with them.

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Moving Tatu and Loulis to Canada

While making the decision to move Tatu and Loulis to Canada, many things were considered. Where they would live, where would they be happiest, who would they spend time with, what were the options and possibilities? In my mind, I saw Sue Ellen as a potential new friend for both Tatu and Loulis. There was space in the building, the area previously occupied by Pepper and Sue Ellen; their favorite place, right at the front of the building, with a great view of everyone coming and going, with the best beds in the Chimphouse. It was an extension built in 2004 for our seniors, who have all adored this special space—Sue still does. The plan was to quarantine Tatu and Loulis in this area, then, eventually let them choose more locations in the Chimphouse as they became comfortable with their new surroundings.

The building is big, and there are lots of options. Over the years, YOU have helped make Fauna a very special place…

You have helped me build the Islands.
You have helped me grow start a Lifetime Care Fund. You have helped me add extensions.
You have helped me build a Skywalk.

And you’ve given me the tools to offer the chimps the best possible lifestyle they could hope for in captivity. You have helped provide a fission-fusion society with all the options, the different locations, the complex environment—and of course all the new doors you’ve helped me create. Because of all of you, life is better for all of them!

Friends of Washoe will match any donations given towards this new skywalk section for Sue, Lou and Tatu…

The chimpanzees of Fauna have options, so many choices, and a chance to move about, to explore, to hide, to be in cozy spaces or to be in big open areas with nature, views of the farm, the pond and its many daily visitors, and the staff traveling around. None of this would have been possible without your support. You have always been there when I needed you, and I do need you now, for another door, and another section of skywalk…

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The Sue Lou Tatu Skywalk!

Last winter a wonderful friend, supporter and volunteer, Kathleen Asselin, gave us a gift to do a new extension of skywalk. It is complete and it is a great addition! There was a new door added and a staircase section of skywalk that connects to the existing elevated areas. There is a small amount of funding left…enough to pay for another new door…but that’s about it. So, let’s work together to allow Sue, Tatu and Lou to move over to the other side of the building—from the mezzanine to Jeanie’s area—that would be AMAZING!

Fifty feet of skywalk will cost $25,000.00. Can we raise this? We have $3,000.00 already; we need $22,000.00 more. We’ve done it before, I know we can we do it again! I’d love your help to have this special place built this fall, before winter arrives.

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I know how much you care, and I know how much you have always wanted to help make the world a better place for the chimps, after their years in research. They get so much pleasure from these outdoor locations, passing days going for walks, resting in the sun, surrounded by the sounds of nature, and the occasional tractor or four-wheeler. They are moments in time for the chimps, special moments, peaceful moments, that we all know they certainly do deserve.

Tatu and Loulis need a space to call their own, where they can feel secure, protected and enjoy a new life with new friends…a peaceful space for bonds to form, and new friendships to grow.

Thank you for caring. Thank you for helping. And thank you forunderstanding just how import- ant this is. We invite you help us start building and we look forward to engraving the names of those of you who donate on the dedication plaque of the Sue•Lou•Tatu Skywalk!

Gloria

If you would like to help: http://www.faunafoundation.org/html/donate.html